Our Ph.D. candidates at the Italian Society of Chemistry National Congress 2021

23/09/2021

During the SCI2021 - XXVII National Congress of the Italian Society of Chemistry (Società Italiana di Chimica), our Ph.D. students had the opportunity to share latest updates on their ongoing projects. Raffaella Lamuraglia, Francesco Abate and Roberta Zanini presented their contributions during the works of the ABC Division (Ambiente e Beni Culturali).

Raffaella led the audience on a journey through her findings on frescoes’ technology at the roman time in Aquileia. By combining petrographic (POM) and microchemical (SEM-EDS) analyzes, she was able to identify the supply quarries of raw materials used to make the mortars and a palette of precious inorganic pigments. The interpretation of the results from a historical-artistic and archaeometric point of view made it possible to hypothesize the location of a Roman residential area in the outskirt of Aquileia, providing new starting points for research.

Francesco shared the first results of his investigations on ancient coins. In particular, he showed how a coin covered with thick soil encrustations can be identified without touching it, using X-Ray Tomography and profitably collaborating with archaeologists. He also explained how XRF and FIB-SEM can work together for a modern diagnostic protocol.

Roberta spoke about Laser Ablation (LA) coupled to ICP-MS as a means of obtaining in-depth elemental imaging, depicting how this powerful technique can come in hand for the study of corrosion process on ancient glasses. She explained the potentiality of using the layer-by-layer elemental maps for investigating how the composition of altered glass changes from the bulk to the surface, thus providing information about the kinetic of the corrosion mechanism.SCI2021 represented an incredible opportunity for Italian and foreigner researchers to meet each other, and share ideas and vision, even if virtually.

This 8-days event has involved more than 2000 people, featuring many keynote lectures from distinguished speakers, like the two Nobel Prizes in Chemistry, Roald Hoffmann and Stanley Whittingham.

 

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